Highlights from the 30 Paintings in 30 Days Challenge

During the challenge I painted more than thirty paintings ranging from 4x5" to 24x18" on paper and cradled panel. To get through this it really helped to set some goals and create a strategy. Working in batches, I explored color palettes that were new to me, and new painting processes.  This was a great opportunity to expand my painting vocabulary. The process I used generated many painting starts, finished pieces and new ideas. The images below are from the first two weeks.  More will be showcased in the next two blog posts.

Christine Sauer, "Urban Flora II", image 8x6" acrylic on paper, matted to 14x11" $70

Christine Sauer, "Urban Flora II", image 8x6" acrylic on paper, matted to 14x11" $70

Working alongside others, even though it was virtual on Instagram and some postings in a Facebook group, provided a level of accountability that kept me on track.  It wasn't easy to keep up the pace.  Several other things in the works were put on hold.  And lots of other stuff fell through the cracks like dishes, laundry, etc., you know, all that fun stuff!  

The "Urban Flora" group of paintings were inspired by flora from my small but abundant New Orleans garden.  The "Marvels and Mysteries" batch are imaginative little worlds that reflect a fascination with microbiology.  All paintings in this post are 8x6" floating in 14x11" mats that easily fit in frames of that size. $70 each.   If you are interested in dressing up your walls with one or a grouping of these, please email me at csauerarts@yahoo.com.  Framed option in bright white or natural wood also available, 14x11",  $175. Free shipping in the US

Click images below to enlarge. 

STUDIO TIP #3

Use Pixlr to enhance your promotional materials and social media postings.  Pixlr is a free app that I downloaded to my Android device.  There's an online version too. It’s become a main go-to for a variety of applications. I use it creatively to generate new ideas for artwork. But for this post, I'm going to show how it can be used to create eye-catching images for both print and online use. 

It was possible to create very nice postcards with Pixlr photos using MOO for the printing.  This is pretty great ‘cause it saves lots of steps and time not having to take high res photos with a dslr camera for print purposes!!  Not to mention that it is a fun app to use.

On the right are a few screen shots from my device and some photos to show a bit of the process.

  • For this example I used the Collage feature in the app.  You can choose several photos from any Album on your device. 
  • I chose four recent works on paper paintings from the Camera Roll.  The app pops them into an arrangement that can be easily changed.  It’s fun to see all of the variations that are possible. 
  • I increased the space between images and made the corners rounded.
  • Once you have settled on a configuration that you like, click DONE.  Then save the image to your Albums or share with Facebook, Instagram and more. When posting to Instagram I often use it to show a variety of images or views. Super simple and fast!
  • Below are some arrangements I tried with work from my new website before settling on one that would be printed onto a postcard.
©Christine Sauer , postcard examples

©Christine Sauer , postcard examples

©Christine Sauer, postcard examples

©Christine Sauer, postcard examples

  • Here’s the final version that I had printed on a postcard by MOO.   Represented are 1-2 paintings from each of the Collections on my website: Marvels and Mysteries, Ebb and Flow, Energy and Movement, Earthy, and Circles.  https://christinesauerstudio.space
©Christine Sauer  Postcard Back,  PS.  If you’d like one of these sweet little post cards, shoot me an email with your address.  csauerarts@yahoo.com

©Christine Sauer  Postcard Back,

PS.  If you’d like one of these sweet little post cards, shoot me an email with your address. csauerarts@yahoo.com

 

 

 

©Christine Sauer, Collage Feature Pixlr

©Christine Sauer, Collage Feature Pixlr

©Christine Sauer, Pixlr screen shot

©Christine Sauer, Pixlr screen shot

©Christine Sauer, Pixlr screen shot

©Christine Sauer, Pixlr screen shot

The Marvels and Mysteries Collection

These abstract paintings, for me, have a sense of revealing the surprising and the mysterious.  The title, “Marvels and Mysteries”, is inspired by a favorite childhood book, “Marvels and Mysteries of Our Animal World”. This was one of the many books about animals, biology and nature that I pored over as a kid.  This fascination with biology and nature often percolates up through my art in imaginative and unpredictable ways.  

Christine Sauer "Marvels and Mysteries II"  24x24"  $900, acrylic, mixed media on canvas 

As this collection of abstract paintings developed, they appeared to reveal mysterious and invented natural events or processes, a kind of organic soup of life. Complex, lively surfaces were created by layering acrylic paints and sometimes collage in an improvisational manner.  Vibrant color and lush texture coalesce to engage the viewer to take an up-close look to discover visual surprises in these invented worlds.

Painting Process: Keeping it Fresh and Lively

My paintings emerge out of an enjoyment of the painting process. Intuitive and improvisational, the process is a journey and the end point is always a surprise.  It usually begins by applying color and arranging paper, fabric or paint skins out of my collage stash in a freewheeling manner. Or sometimes I create a textured surface using various acrylic pastes or gels before adding the first layers of color and other materials. The unexpected, serendipitous magic that happens when working this way is what excites me as an artist and gives the work its potency.  

 Christine Sauer, " Marvels and Mysteries IV" 20x16" acrylic and mixed media on canvas   Final layers being added to this work in process.  "To pour or not to pour?"  It's important to stay brave since choices seem riskier toward the end of the process.

 Christine Sauer, " Marvels and Mysteries IV" 20x16" acrylic and mixed media on canvas   Final layers being added to this work in process.  "To pour or not to pour?"  It's important to stay brave since choices seem riskier toward the end of the process.

The images surface through the process.  Sometimes the initial layer is engaging, spontaneous and feels like a complete visual statement so it becomes a keeper.  Some paintings need more attention.  Layers of paint are added from thick impasto to dripped, scraped, and thinly glazed passages that conceal or reveal the initial layers. Complex, lively surfaces are created where vibrant color and lush texture coalesce to engage the viewer to take an up-close look to discover visual surprises.   Mark making includes loose and painterly brushwork, dripped paint, scribbled drawing, freeform printing, stenciled application and more.

©ChristineSauer, Details from paintings from the Collections on this site.

©ChristineSauer, Details from paintings from the Collections on this site.

Exploring multiple approaches to painting energizes the process for me, keeping things fresh and interesting.  I am a perpetual student, always learning and experimenting.  In the studio, there are often several works in process going on simultaneously.  They are not always from the same series or groups. The process is a spiral with exciting tangents developing along the way.  Eventually common threads emerge between artworks and they become a loosely connected collection as presented on this website.

©Christine Sauer, During painting sessions I always offload the leftover paint on my brushes and tools from the main project unto additional surfaces such as paper,  raw canvas, and fabric.   This often yields interesting materials for collage or sometimes they become artworks on their own. 

©Christine Sauer, During painting sessions I always offload the leftover paint on my brushes and tools from the main project unto additional surfaces such as paper,  raw canvas, and fabric.   This often yields interesting materials for collage or sometimes they become artworks on their own.